Dads, Take Your Leave

Having experienced the politics and the payoffs, 15 fathers make a case for paternity leave

Photography by Smeeta Mahanti

It’s no secret that the United States ranks last among developed countries in measures of family policy. We’re the only one that offers zero paid weeks of leave to new mothers and fathers, and while our current policy, the Family and Medical Leave Act signed into law by then-president Clinton in 1993, allows for 12 unpaid weeks of leave, it doesn’t even apply to nearly 40 percent of American workers (it only covers employees of more than one year at a company of at least 50 workers).

Accordingly, new moms and dads face financial and career-related challenges to taking time off following the birth of a child. Fathers in particular come up against antiquated gender stereotypes when hoping to take paternity leave, as they are miscast in the family role of breadwinner, rather than that of caregiver. “The idea of men needing to have time off when their kids are born is an idea that is still taking root in our society, and a number of our employers don’t really support that idea through their paternity leave policies,” says Dr. Kenneth Matos, senior director of research at Families and Work Institute.

New dads also face public criticism when taking time off to be with their families. Recall the dustup that followed Mets player Daniel Murphy’s decision to miss the first two games of the 2014 baseball season following the birth of his son.

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But social trends are changing fast, says Dr. Matos. Men are spending more time caring for their children—nearly 3 times as many hours per week today than in 1965. And the percentage of moms acting as family breadwinners has quadrupled since 1960 (mothers are the sole or primary earners in 40 percent of all households with children under the age of 18).

As fathers become more involved caregivers, young workers also expect their company’s policy to allow for changing parenting roles. Some employers have caught on, and the trend towards a more extensive parental leave policy is noticeable in industries where competition for talent is fierce. Tech giants such as Google, Facebook, Airbnb, and Square offer up to four months of paid leave to new moms and dads, including adoptive or foster parents. At certain smaller companies—such as the 17-person Oregon office of gDiapers, which offers 6 months of paid parental leave to all new parents—a generous leave policy reflects the employer’s awareness of the importance of work-life balance for all parents. Says Matos:

Research backs up the wisdom of these benefits—good things happen when dads take paternity leave. According to The Boston College Center for Work & Family, publisher of the research series The New Dad, the mother and father strengthen their relationship (regardless of whether they are married), the mother boosts her earnings, rates of maternal depression decrease, and the father builds a more secure father-child relationship. “Leave is a broader, family-building moment,” says Dr. Matos. “They set the norms for what is going to happen. It also establishes them both as equal partners in upbringing as opposed to the standard of, ‘She’s the one that knows everything and he just goes to her and she gate-keeps.’”

Even as a handful of employers improve their paternity leave policies, however, workplace politics don’t always jive with policy, and many dads find themselves having to fight for the necessity of leave if they want time off with their new families.

To find out how to pioneer better paternity leaves, we enlisted 15 family-leave veterans across multiple industries—medicine, law, technology, education, energy, construction, business, and real estate—and asked them to pay it forward with advice for other dads-to-be.

“It’s important for several distinct reasons,” says Gabe Ross, 40, an attorney with Shute, Mihaly & Weinberger in San Francisco, who took a combination of paid and unpaid leave with his first child. Says Ross:

“I wanted to spend the time with my son. That’s pretty straightforward. But it was also in small part political: I think that full male partnership in household work, especially the most time-consuming type of such work, childcare, is essential to gender equality. There are various policy solutions to make this possible, like paternity leave, but we each need to enact it ourselves. So I did.”

These 15 fathers unanimously agreed on a single piece of advice for new dads: Take your paternity leave. Most of them wished they’d taken even more time off. So the implicit first step is to ask your company for leave. About 20 percent of US companies that should be following the Family and Medical Leave Act regulations have self-reported that they are non-compliant with the law—due to a lack of paternity leave. Do your research on whether or not your company qualifies before you head to HR to make your ask. It’s also possible that you live in one of the seven states in the US that has enacted some form of paid leave.

Even if your company doesn’t qualify, if you’re among the first dads to request leave, it might encourage the company to extend any maternity leave policies they might already have in place. At the very least, you might discover some creative scheduling options that allow you to combine segments of vacation, sick leave, or unpaid time off in order to take leave.

We got dads who’ve done it to weigh in on pioneering a better paternity leave experience—and they came back with advice on lessening the social stigma, negotiating for leave at work, bonding with your new child, and being a better partner.


15 fathers share their top 10 insights on paternity leave, and what to do if you’re considering taking it

 

1. Flip gender roles: Let fathers be full parents
Dads taking on active caretaking roles will help shift outdated parenting stereotypes. “There’s a lot of anger in a number of fathers that feel, ‘I’m not babysitting, I’m parenting. I am a full person here,’” says researcher Kenneth Matos. “There’s kind of a feedback loop that happens with parental sexism, where the more we reinforce women as mother, the more we also reinforce man as breadwinner, and the two are kind of intertwined and you can’t really fix one without also fixing the other.”

“There’s a lot of noise from your work—pressure from your male peers about competition and making yourself less relevant. There was also a lot of feeling like you’re weaker because you’re a man who wants to take time off with his child. If you pay attention to that, you’re not going to do the right thing, which is pay attention to your kid.”
— William Roger, formerly Assistant City Manager, Berkeley, Calif. (1 year partially paid)

“Work perception management was emotionally draining. Know that people will think less of you. Be ready to tell people to go *@#$ themselves.”
— Timothy Skowronski, Director of Operations at Sproutling, San Francisco (Factory and Field Lead at Square during leave: 9 weeks paid)

“Don’t let others’ interpretation of a ‘man’s role’ influence your decision. I look at being a father as my most important role, and this was my start. I was jumping in with both feet.”
— Jason Bell, Construction Project Manager at Johnstone Moyer, Pleasant Hill, Calif. (Construction Project Manager at Clark Builders Group during leave: 2 weeks paid)

Jason Bell trying to wrap up snack time at home with daughter Sloane, 20 months.

Jason Bell, 33, took two weeks from his job as a construction project manager after his daughter Sloane, 20 months, was born.

“I was surprised to find a different, strong instinct kicking in: dad nesting. After talking with a couple of other new dads, I realized I wasn’t alone in this. I suddenly became very aware of highly specific furniture needs (where can I order a custom triangular table with exactly 24-inch sides?). I installed motion-activated lights in the closets. I got phone-controlled smart bulbs (better for feeding the baby at night). I found myself pouring through this amazing book called Home Comforts—sort of an old-fashioned manual/treatise on housekeeping. It’s a big, heavy book with exhaustive, bracingly pedantic directions for how to take care of a home. Like, 20 pages on exactly how to do the dishes.”
— Scott Raymond, Engineering Manager at Airbnb, San Francisco (2 months paid)

“I’d go to the park during the day and get, ‘Oh, is it mom’s day off?’ To which I’d answer, ‘Everyday is mom’s day off.’ It’s interesting because short of staying home and being the primary caregiver, dads aren’t always included in the space. For example, my son threw a tantrum in the grocery store—he’s screaming and I’m holding him and rubbing his back, and a woman comes up to me and said, ‘Oh my god where is his mother?’ I realized that I was just being seen as a male, and males are not seen as nurturing. Optically, it just didn’t seem right to others. While I’m not a mother, I’m still involved in mothering behaviors as a man. The disconnect between what it visually looks like to be a dad taking care of his son versus the notion of every child needing his mom is an odd place to exist.”
— William Roger, formerly Assistant City Manager, Berkeley, Calif. (1 year partially paid)

2. Flip gender roles: Let mothers be full employees  
On the flip side, says Matos, “A lot of systems are set up to kind of push women out of the workforce.” The remedy: With both parents pitching in for caretaking, working mothers can put additional energy into fulfilling their career potential.

“I wanted to be able to support the rest of my family with this major change.  And I believe that having men take parental leave is important for gender equality… I took two months right after my son was born, and also did a bunch of half-weeks a couple of months later. The goal of the half-weeks was to help transition the family back to normal life post-pregnancy and with my son around. That was helpful for the family.”
— Fritz Darden-Behr, Engineering Manager at Facebook, Seattle (4 months paid)

“If there’s one takeaway that was really important for me about being home, it’s how hard it is to be home: There’s a lack of understanding around what’s required to take care of a child. People think, ‘What do you do all day?’ When in fact, trying to go to the park looks like this: you get them ready and get everything packed, the kid poops up their back, you take off everything, wipe up poop, give them a bath, get dressed again, and then they’re hungry, so you get them in the high chair, make food, feed the kid, now the kid is happy but wants a bottle, and now they’re ready for a nap. You never get out of the house. If every man had to be the primary caregiver for their kid for 6 months, the laws in this country would change. Because people would understand.”
— William Roger, formerly Assistant City Manager, Berkeley, Calif. (1 year partially paid)

“Parental leave is kind of a gender equality issue. We can’t expect equality at work unless our policies encourage equality in the home. Especially in departments like Engineering, we know how important it is to improve the ratio of women on our teams. That leads to a somewhat surprising (to me) realization: One of the best ways to get more women in tech is to have a robust parental leave policy, and to encourage dads to use it just as much as moms. Which is why I always call my leave ‘parental’ instead of ‘paternity’.”
— Scott Raymond, Engineering Manager at Airbnb, San Francisco (2 months paid)

3. Pick up parenting slack
A new baby provides more than enough work for two people. There are endless bottles to clean, meals to cook, diapers to change, onesies to wash, and doctors to visit—you’re not useless just because you can’t breastfeed. Taking on lots of tasks also lets your partner recover.

“No new mother should be expected to do it alone during those first few weeks. Labor, delivery, and postpartum can be so difficult both physically and mentally. Then you add the craziness of those first few weeks of caring for an infant: constantly-interrupted sleep, uncertainty, diaper-changing, piles of laundry; all the non-baby tasks of cooking dinner, cleaning up, taking out the trash, responding to email; and if you’ve got an older kid (or in our case, two) to take care of? It is wrong to expect a new mother to handle all of that solo. Plus, why would I want to miss out on all that excitement? “
— Andrew Garland, Partner at The New Teacher Project, Oakland, Calif. (4 weeks paid)

Andrew Garland is on his third leave, for daughter Beatrice (one and a half weeks old, in his arms). He also took leave for daughters Ruby Mae, 5, and Julia, 3.

Andrew Garland, 35, is currently on leave from education nonprofit TNTP for daughter Beatrice, one and a half weeks old. He also took leave at the birth of his older daughters, Ruby Mae, 5, and Julia, 3.

“Remember that you are only doing what is fairly expected of you. By being a man taking leave and taking responsibility for that time, you are not doing anything special or praiseworthy. Or, rather, you’re doing something exactly as special and praiseworthy as your partner’s equivalent work. On the other hand, if you feel frustrated about the amount of childcare work you’re doing in proportion to your partner, remember, as my friend Sarah told me early on: In a truly 50-50 relationship, both partners think they’re doing 60 percent of the work. You’ll be amazed at how much tension that formula clears.”
— Gabe Ross, Attorney at Shute, Mihaly & Weinberger, San Francisco (2 weeks paid, 8 weeks unpaid)

“Sleep becomes a drug you’re addicted to but cannot afford. You have to allow (sometimes force) your wife to sleep whenever possible, so you have to pick up and do whatever you can to make that happen.”
— Jason Bell, Construction Project Manager at Johnstone Moyer, Pleasant Hill, Calif. (Construction Project Manager at Clark Builders Group during leave: 2 weeks paid)

“For the first week, my wife was told to stay in bed as much as possible, which made my job pretty straightforward: Take care of the kids and house enough that she could rest. So I familiarized myself with Google Express, GoodEggs, and Amazon Pantry. I learned how to do chores with a baby in one arm— laundry: pretty easy; dishes: very hard.”
— Scott Raymond, Engineering Manager at Airbnb, San Francisco (2 months paid)

 

4. Get uninterrupted family time
The opportunity to spend even an entire day with your family can feel rare, but taking leave for kid number two or three presents a wonderful opportunity to spend big blocks of focused time with your new addition as well as your older kids.  

“When my first daughter was born four years ago, I was in the thick of my own startup…I unplugged for a little while, but a sense of work obligation got the best of me, and I was back in the office after a week. In retrospect, I regret that. Those first few months of a kid’s life are so precious—and so hard—that they deserve all of the time you can give them.”
— Scott Raymond, Engineering Manager, Airbnb, San Francisco (2 months paid)

“I work long hours in a client-driven business. Without paternity leave, I knew I would risk getting pulled in different directions by obligations other than my family.”
— Andrew Avsec, Intellectual Property Attorney at Brinks, Gilson & Lione, Chicago (2 weeks paid)

“Taking leave was mostly—if not all—amazing. My wife and I lead such busy lives and careers that we seldom have time to slow down and enjoy what we have. This time off gave us a chance to really spend some time together to be with my son and not have to worry about work or many other outside distractions,” says Anthony Lewis, Software Engineer at Northrop Grumman, Los Angeles (7 weeks paid)

“I spent a lot of time playing with my older daughter. We built elaborate LEGO contraptions. We made forts. We started geocaching. I started to acclimate to being the only man at a crowded playground, and becoming friends with the other ‘moms’ at the gymnastics class.”
— Scott Raymond, Engineering Manager at Airbnb, San Francisco (2 months paid)

“You’ll rarely have the opportunity to spend so much time as a family. You’ll want to take the time to visit family and hopefully get a moment to rest and relax. You’re also going to be sleep deprived, and thus less effective at work anyway.
— Ben Bachelder, Project Engineer at Sun Light & Power, Berkeley, Calif. (3 weeks at birth, then 2 days/week for 3 months)

Ben Bachelder, photographed with his two sons, took three weeks directly following the birth of his youngest, then took two days off per week for the next three months.

Ben Bachelder, 37, took three weeks leave from his job as a project engineer at Sun, Light & Power directly following the birth of his youngest. He then took two days off per week for the next three months.

5. Evolve your workplace culture  
Even companies with generous parental leave policies can be unwelcoming of leave-taking, and will pressure new parents to come back quickly. But research has shown that at companies where male coworkers have taken parental leave, other new dads are more likely to follow suit. “If you’re a manager, encourage your team to take parental leave,” says Scott Raymond, an engineering manager at Airbnb who took a two-month leave and wrote a parental-leave manifesto of sorts to fellow working parents at his office. “Help shift the standard for everyone.”

“Men in particular didn’t get it. It was a very foreign concept that I would take off time like that. Which was interesting to me because my boss at the time was a guy who tried hard to understand, and would say that it was important for him to spend time with his kids every night after work. I thought it was funny because he had a stay-at-home-wife doing all the childcare, cooking, and cleaning. My taking leave was acceptable because [I worked for the city of] Berkeley, but I got a lot of looks around being a man and taking off time. People thought it was bold, so I had to wonder how much it affected my career. It didn’t really—I ended up becoming the deputy city manager. Even though people kind of frowned at it, because of the policy, I was entitled to it. So I just did it.”
— William Roger, formerly Assistant City Manager, Berkeley, Calif. (1 year partially paid)

“I joined Facebook when my wife was seven months pregnant, and they encouraged me to take the full amount of time even before I accepted the job. My skip-level boss is Tom Stocky, who has been very public about his own parental leave. His attitude sets the tone for the team.”
— Fritz Darden-Behr, Engineering Manager at Facebook, Seattle (4 months paid)

 

6. Leverage career capital to negotiate for more leave time or pay
Have you ever worked gratis through the weekend, skipped a wedding at the last minute, or come back early from vacation to get a jump on that big new contract? Track those events, and drop them into your ask for paid leave.  

“We had no policy—it had not been granted in the past. I had to negotiate. Luckily (or unluckily), I had been called back halfway through a two-week vacation in Italy with my pregnant wife to help deal with a transaction that was falling apart. I was basically given carte blanche to ask for what it would take, and I made the ask for two weeks of paternity leave concurrent with the callback from vacation. I think the language I used that was most effective was guilt-tripping my boss about calling me back: ‘It was our last vacation before the baby came…’
— Jim Marett, Corporate Development Manager, Ogin Energy, Boston (2 weeks paid)

“If you think you have the personal capital to burn, don’t be afraid to burn it. There is little that will be more worth it,” says Marett. 

“Absolutely read the benefits policy at your workplace. There may be options for creative scheduling that weren’t apparent.”
— Alex Pearson, fellow, hematology / oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (18 days paid)

“I negotiated after the fact: Because I ended up doing significant work while I was on leave, I asked to be paid for some of the time that firm policy would have left unpaid. The firm agreed, and later made such payment a part of the official parental leave policy. I should note that the handbook also says that the firm does not encourage such work, but recognizes that it happens. I should also emphasize that the negotiation was relatively easy for me because I was already a partner in the firm. That gave me job security and a degree of respect from the managing partner.”
— Gabe Ross, Attorney at Shute, Mihaly & Weinberger, San Francisco (2 weeks paid, 8 weeks unpaid)

Gabe Ross, 40, is an attorney for a small firm that does environmental and land use work. "My firm is over half women, no matter how you count: total workforce, attorneys-only, partners, ownership share. The firm is very used to and open to fathers taking leave; it is assumed that they will," he says.

Gabe Ross, 40, is an attorney for a small firm that does environmental and land use work. “My firm is over half women, no matter how you count: total workforce, attorneys-only, partners, ownership share. The firm is very used to and open to fathers taking leave; it is assumed that they will,” he says.

 

7. Start banking PTO and vacation days ASAP
Until policies change at the federal, state, or company level, using saved vacation time is your best bet for getting paid time off with your new family. Expecting parents should start banking days now.

“I planned ahead and accrued three months of vacation and sick time. Then instead of getting paid for three months, I asked to be paid at half time for six months. It was really good for me because I had half-time pay for the majority of the time. “
— William Roger, formerly Assistant City Manager, Berkeley, Calif. (1 year partially paid)

“Subspecialty physician training takes place on a strict yearly schedule—if you take medical leave, then you will have difficulty graduating on time. My son was born during my one-month Intensive Care Unit rotation during residency. Michigan has the progressive policy (I’m not kidding) of allowing four days of paternity leave for house officers, plus the ability to take up to 14 days (of 28 days total for the year, including weekend days) of vacation around the time of your child’s birth. Fortunately, my program let me move vacation time to spend more than 2 weeks at home with my family.”
— Alex Pearson, fellow, hematology / oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (18 days paid)

 

8. Your workflow: Set it (and try to forget it)
When taking even a long weekend makes you anxious, a week-long leave might feel impossible—but your company probably won’t fall apart without you. That said, sit down with your manager to create a workflow that sets up you and your team for success in your absence. And expect to feel conflicted about career implications and burdening your teammates.

“Before I left, I compiled a list of the issues I was tracking and their current states. I also made myself available to take short calls while I was away.  My co-workers respected my time off and did not call. It turns out that it was harder for me to turn off my desire to be involved at work than it was for them to work without me.”
— Jason Bell, Construction Project Manager at Johnstone Moyer, Pleasant Hill, Calif. (Construction Project Manager at Clark Builders Group during leave: 2 weeks paid)

“I was concerned about the impact to my career in general, and my standing at Square in particular. The career concerns went away after I thought about them for a while—a few months do not make or break a career. My standing at Square was a whole other matter; it was made quite clear to me that management thought that the greater company policy was too generous. So I was off for three weeks, back for a month, repeat. I played a supporting role, and ran some small projects or provided insight to others. Being semi-available made things better for the team for sure, but made it harder for me to disconnect and reconnect while I was coming in and out.”
— Timothy Skowronski, Director of Operations at Sproutling, San Francisco (Factory and Field Lead at Square during leave: 9 weeks paid)

“A month or so in advance of the baby’s due date, I made a detailed plan for leave. For each of my work streams and my responsibilities, I either a.) Delegated to someone for the duration of my leave, b.) Handled it in advance of leave, or c.) Postponed until after leave. It’s difficult—but also freeing—to realize that work can continue just fine without you.”
— Andrew Garland, Partner at The New Teacher Project, Oakland, Calif. (4 weeks paid)

“If I were doing it again, I’d try to make sure I wasn’t placing work above the family, especially at that critical time. There are work things that we perceive to be really important in the moment, but usually with the benefit of hindsight, we realize they weren’t that important after all.”
— Roger Austin, Real Estate Investor and Entrepreneur, Raleigh, North Carolina (3-4 months informal leave)

“Talk with your manager. If you’re worried about parental leave being a ‘career-limiting move,’ be open about it, and work together to plan for your absence. In my case, I asked that my email access be kept on, so I could stay aware of a few projects. (And I know leave policies vary by country, so talk to HR about what applies for you.) On the other hand, resist the urge to overcommit, or to make a bunch of progress on projects. Set expectations with your team—let them know you’re not on vacation, but you are off the grid. Practice humility by recognizing your team will probably survive alright without you.”
— Scott Raymond, Engineering Manager at Airbnb, San Francisco (2 months paid) 

 

Scott Raymond, 35, is an engineering manager at Airbnb and took two months of leave. "I underestimated how all-consuming this job would be," he says.

Scott Raymond, 35, is an engineering manager at Airbnb and took two months of leave. “I underestimated how all-consuming this job would be,” he says.

 

9. Time it to help ease major transitions
Lots of the dads we spoke with mentioned that while the first two weeks with their new baby were wonderful, their family really needed help when their wife’s maternity leave ended, or their baby started up at daycare or with a nanny. Consider breaking up your leave to ease those rough transitions.

“I delayed my leave and took it in my son’s third month. My wife had already taken her leave, and mine allowed her to begin her semester while we interviewed nannies.”
— David, Psychologist at McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts (1 month partially paid)

“A coworker who had two kids and had gone through the same paternity leave process recommended breaking up my leave. He said that Dad’s job is really to take care of Mom in the time right after giving birth—so if I really wanted to make the most of the time, I could take it in chunks. I took two weeks at birth to help my wife, the next two weeks when my daughter was about four months and my wife went back to work and we started with our nannyshare, then the final two weeks when my daughter was 10 months old and full of personality. So happy I did that.”
— Alex Green, Project Manager at Apple, San Francisco (6 weeks paid, taken in 2-week chunks)

“The issue we had is that my leave ended at about the same time her mother went home, so my wife went from two helpers to zero very quickly, and that was a rough adjustment phase. For next time, I would talk to my wife about taking the time closer to when she’d be ready to go back to work and the grandparents were going back home. Or I would maybe re-enter work with some half-days to ease the transition for me and my wife.”
— Jason Bell, Construction Project Manager at Johnstone Moyer, Pleasant Hill, Calif. (Construction Project Manager at Clark Builders Group during leave: 2 weeks paid)

10. Enjoy it
Paternity leave isn’t a vacation—your little bundle of joy will bring you to your knees. But all of the dads loved taking leave, and said it provided a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enjoy their new, rapidly changing family.

“What was amazing? Waking up to Carter’s cries and making him smile. Sitting with him in the sun on my deck. Talking walks with him and sitting in the park. Yeah, being a dad is cool as shit.”
— Timothy Skowronski, Director of Operations at Sproutling, San Francisco (Factory and Field Lead at Square during leave: 9 weeks paid)

“Little fingers are amazing, as are giggles. The frequent-enough feeling that I was actually competent to take care of him was energizing. The praise that I’d get from older women while out walking with the baby was pretty fun, if silly.”
— Gabe Ross, Attorney at Shute, Mihaly & Weinberger, San Francisco (2 weeks paid, 8 weeks unpaid)

“Take it now, because your child is only this age once. And you’ll only get to take paid paternity leave once, too,” says Alex Green. 

Alex Green with daughter Eloise, 19 months, after a mini-meltdown at San Francisco's Alamo Square Park.

Alex Green with daughter Eloise, 19 months, after a mini-meltdown at San Francisco’s Alamo Square Park.

“It would be inconceivable not to have that time with my new family. It was truly priceless time. I felt like the entire world was just contained within the 30-foot radius that encompassed my wife, son and me.”
—Jim Marett, Corporate Development Manager, Ogin Energy, Boston (2 weeks paid)

“You can make more money, but you can’t make more time. If you have an opportunity to take time off to support your wife and be with your family, take as much as you can. I’ve met many older people with successful careers that look back and wish they wouldn’t have worked so hard or travelled so much at the sacrifice of their families. However, I’ve never met anyone who has looked back on their life and said ‘I wish I would’ve spent less time with my kids.’”
— Anthony Lewis, Software Engineer at Northrop Grumman, LA.

“The fact is that you are going to fall in love with your kid in a way that you never knew that you’d fall in love. The experience of falling in love in that way is a life-changing event—the intimacy of it. Being able to get to know your child, to have both verbal and non-verbal cues, to understand what makes them tick, what makes them laugh. What makes them who they are. It’s something you really don’t want to miss, and it sets up the relationship that you have with your kid of that rest of your life, and it is priceless. There’s all this work and noise, but this is also the opportunity of a lifetime.”
— William Roger, formerly Assistant City Manager, Berkeley, Calif. (1 year partially paid)

 

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